6.19.08, 7 p.m. — Eugene Drucker

Please join PAGE in the last reading
of
the 2007–08 season,
honoring the best of
literature and music
with Eugene Drucker.

* * *

Violinist for the glorious Emerson String Quartet, Eugene Drucker makes his debut as a novelist with The Savior, the story of a non-Jewish violinist forced to play for the inmates of a Nazi concentration camp. Drucker will accompany his reading by playing music found in the novel—Bach’s “Chaconne” from the Partita in D minor for solo violin. A reception and book signing will follow.

Beautifully conceived and gracefully written, The Savior is a complex and illuminating character study of a man severed from his past expectations and an artist struggling with his identity in the face of human catastrophe.

* * *

PRAISE FOR EUGENE DRUCKER AND
THE SAVIOR

“One of our finest musicians has now distinguished himself in this graceful work of fiction. Eugene Drucker has created a poignant tale of heartbreaking paradoxes and one man’s efforts to solve them through art in the darkest of times.”
—Leon Botstein, president of Bard College and author of The History of Listening

*

“With The Savior, Eugene Drucker has written an elegant, smart, and knowing novel that delves into darkness and explores its many shades.”
—Meg Wolitzer, author of The Position and Surrender, Dorothy

*

“Eugene Drucker brings a musician’s understanding of tempo, tone, and interpretation to this book. He’s an artist in two fields; maybe more.”
—Paul Newman

*

“Violinist for the magnificent Emerson String Quartet, whose interpretations of Beethoven and Shostakovich are unparalleled, Drucker has written a haunting novel of the waning days of WWII. When a Kommandant orders him to play the violin for an audience of near-death concentration camp detainees, young musician Gottfried Keller is forced to participate in a ghastly experiment with hope. Repelled, Gottfried reluctantly complies: ‘It would have been easier to face a row of corpses in a morgue.’ Over the four days he serves as camp musician, Gottfried reminisces about his treatment of his Jewish former girlfriend, Marietta, and of his Jewish schoolmate friend, Ernst, a violinist who fled as the Nazis took power. (Drucker’s own violinist father emigrated to the U.S. in 1938.) As the days wear on, Gottfried attempts to separate himself from the nightmare of the camp by trying not to comprehend what is taking place there, and it is here, Drucker intimates, that his culpability lies, especially as Gottfried begins to draw inspiration from his audience. Drucker writes lyrically about the music Gottfried plays (including Ysae’s ‘L’Aurore’), and his morality tale has bite.”
Publishers Weekly

* * *

Thursday, June 19, 2008
7:00 p.m.
The National Arts Club
15 Gramercy Park South, NYC

Advertisements
Published in: on May 27, 2008 at 1:09 pm  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://pageseries.wordpress.com/2008/05/27/61908-7-pm-eugene-drucker/trackback/

%d bloggers like this: